Loading Events

Orcas Center presents on the Center Stage Screen:

The Met Opera: Ariadne Auf Naxos

Sunday, March 27th – 1pm
Runtime:
2 hours and 50 minutes with intermission
Tiered Ticket Pricing:
$47, $25, $5, or Pay What You Can (Minimum $5)
Orcas Center charges a $2 per ticket fee
CLICK HERE for complete information on Ariadne Auf Naxos from The Met – Including cast sheet and synopsis

Due to COVID Precautions, the following guidelines will be followed:

Advance ticket sales only: There will be no box office attendant prior to the performance
Proof of vaccination will be required at the door
Masks will be required inside of Orcas Center
These shows will be socially distanced with assigned seating
These guidelines may change in accordance with government regulations

**Orcas Center’s Tiered Ticket Pricing is based on the needs of your family. The variant in pricing is not based on seat location or dates of performances, rather, what you’re able to afford to help us to maintain our facilities and create quality programming.

Tier A is the true cost per patron of putting on show at the Orcas Center, Tier B is our standard rate, also subsidized by our generous donors, Tier C is a rate subsidized by our generous donors. **


Ariadne Auf Naxos

CLICK HERE for complete information on Ariadne Auf Naxos from The Met – Including cast sheet and synopsis

The Ariadne myth tells how Prince Theseus of Athens set out for Crete to kill the Minotaur, a creature half man, half bull, who was concealed in a labyrinth. Princess Ariadne of Crete fell in love with Theseus and gave him a ball of thread that enabled him to find his way out of the labyrinth after he had killed the Minotaur. When Theseus left Crete, he took Ariadne with him as his bride. During their voyage home, they stopped at the island of Naxos. While Ariadne was asleep, Theseus slipped away and continued his journey to Athens without her. The opera Ariadne auf Naxos begins at this point.

Ariadne is alone in front of her cave. Three nymphs look on and lament her fate. Watching from the wings, the comedians are doubtful whether they will be able to cheer her up. Ariadne recalls her love for Theseus, then imagines herself as a chaste girl, awaiting death. Harlekin tries to divert her with a song, but Ariadne ignores him. As if in a trance, she resolves to await Hermes, messenger of death. He will take her to another world, where everything is pure. When the comedians’ efforts continue to fail, Zerbinetta finally addresses Ariadne directly, woman to woman, explaining to her the human need to change an old love for a new. Insulted, Ariadne leaves. After Zerbinetta has finished her speech, her colleagues leap back onto the scene, competing for her attention. Zerbinetta gives in to Harlekin’s comic protestations of love and the comedians exit.

The nymphs announce the approach of a ship: It carries the young god Bacchus, who has escaped the enchantress Circe. Bacchus’s voice is heard in the distance, and Ariadne prepares to greet her visitor, whom she thinks must be death at last. When he appears, she at first mistakes him for Theseus come back to her, but he majestically proclaims his godhood. Entranced by Ariadne’s beauty, Bacchus tells her that he would sooner see the stars vanish than give her up. Reconciled to a new existence, Ariadne joins Bacchus as they ascend to the heavens. Zerbinetta sneaks in to have the last word: “When a new god comes along, we’re dumbstruck.”