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Orcas Center presents on the Center Stage Screen:

Met Opera: Lohengrin

Sunday, April 9th at 12pm
Runtime:
4 hours 35 minutes with intermission
Tiered Ticket Pricing:
$59, $29, $5, or Pay What You Can (Minimum $5)
Orcas Center charges a $2 per ticket fee

COVID Policy Update: Masking is encouraged in the theatre, but no longer required

**Orcas Center’s Tiered Ticket Pricing is based on the needs of your family. The variant in pricing is not based on seat location or dates of performances, rather, what you’re able to afford to help us to maintain our facilities and create quality programming.

Tier A is the true cost per patron of putting on show at the Orcas Center, Tier B is our standard rate, also subsidized by our generous donors, Tier C is a rate subsidized by our generous donors. **


Lohengrin

CLICK HERE for more information about Lohengrin from The Met

Wagner’s soaring masterpiece makes its triumphant return to the Met stage after 17 years. In a sequel to his revelatory production of Parsifal, director François Girard unveils an atmospheric staging that once again weds his striking visual style and keen dramatic insight to Wagner’s breathtaking music, with Music Director Yannick Nézet-Séguin on the podium to conduct a supreme cast led by tenor Piotr Beczała in the title role of the mysterious swan knight. Soprano Tamara Wilson is the virtuous duchess Elsa, falsely accused of murder, going head-to-head with soprano Christine Goerke as the cunning sorceress Ortrud, who seeks to lay her low. Bass-baritone Evgeny Nikitin is Ortrud’s power-hungry husband, Telramund, and bass Günther Groissböck is King Heinrich.

World premiere: Großherzogliches Hoftheater, Weimar, 1850
Lohengrin stands at the epicenter of Richard Wagner’s career—chronologically, thematically, and artistically. It is a Romantic-era reimagining of a persistent Medieval legend about a mystical knight who champions an oppressed maiden on the sole condition that she never ask his name, and the issues at stake range from the spiritual (the role of the divine in human lives) to the political (nation building in times of transition and migration) to the deeply personal (the centrality of mystery in erotic attraction). The wide thematic divergence within the story spurred Wagner to create a score that triumphantly covers all bases, breathtaking in its sweeping variety, yet approachable and theatrically effective.

Wagner set his opera in Antwerp, now in Belgium, around the year 930. The specificity of time and place is key to the tale: a castle (parts of which still exist) on an important river (the Scheldt) on the borderlands of the emerging German nation and at the edge of Christianized Europe—with pockets of paganism still thriving at that time directly to the north. In his new production this season, director François Girard places the opera’s action in an abstract setting that is simultaneously contemporary and fantastical.